is odd and nice. I realise this is not the best place to speak about speaking as we're not speaking, but everyone should learn the international phonetic alphabet and I would be super happy.
me

English Facts

wordswithrinn:

  • English is the child of German.
  • In the US alone, depending on who you are talking to, there are 3-24 dialects of the English language.
  • There’s an entire wiki on dialects alone: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dialects_of_the_English_language
  • Everyone who speaks English is speaking a dialect.
  • There are more people in the world speaking English than there are people in native-English speaking countries
  • The N. American “standard” or media pronunciation is much closer to the English pronunciation of Shakespeare than current UK English.  here’s a nice article on that, but you can find it in the Cambridge as well. http://www.pbs.org/speak/ahead/change/ruining/
  • Yorkshire is generally considered the closest to Old English.
  • The Normans, who spoke French, changed the English writing system from runes to the alphabet we use today.
  • They also set most of the spellings. English wasn’t really standardized until the KJV bible.

Yay for English! A couple of thoughts though:

English is actually the cousin of German (they’re descendants of a common ancestor Proto-Germanic; German does not predate English). Runes were phased out from the ninth century, after the introduction of the Latin alphabet by Irish missionaries two centuries before the Normans invaded. The Normans did bring their French spelling though, and a ton of words and even morphemes, clever things.

Aside from that YES everyone who speaks English speaks a dialect. There isn’t a kind of English which gets special original or correct status. So important to remember.

yamaharfang said: What’s your PhD on? :)

not sure yet. grad school in the US has two years of coursework before the dissertation, so I have some time to decide. something involving fieldwork, something involving syntax-phonology-morphology. right now I’m in love with discourse and information structure, so.

so many options! I love language! I love linguistics!

announcement: I’m moving to Berkeley in August to start my PhD in linguistics. I suspect this blog will become more active because a) I’ll have lots of new exciting things to write about and (probably more to the point) b) studying again will give me ample excuse to procrastinate. in the meantime, I’m going to enjoy my last days being surrounded in the beauty that is Australian English.

mnorgyn:

transiences:andywooo:animeasuka:wafflesforstephanie:yosb:





welcome to harvard: linguistics 101

Is this reality?

Abso-fucking-lutely.

yo the word fucking is actually really interesting because it’s one of american english’s only infixes

YES THIS IS ACTUALLY REALLY COOL MY AP ENGLISH TEACHER WENT ON A 5-MINUTE RANT ABOUT “FUCK” AND HOW IT’S THE ONLY WORD YOU CAN INSERT INTO OTHER WORDS 
I JUST HAVE A LOT OF FEELINGS ABOUT THE WORD “FUCK” OKAY

Actually, ‘fuck’ isn’t the only word you can insert into other words. At least in Australian English, you can do the same with ‘bloody’ — ‘abso-bloody-lutely’. There are probably others too.

for example

mnorgyn:

transiences:andywooo:animeasuka:wafflesforstephanie:yosb:

welcome to harvard: linguistics 101

Is this reality?

Abso-fucking-lutely.

yo the word fucking is actually really interesting because it’s one of american english’s only infixes

YES THIS IS ACTUALLY REALLY COOL MY AP ENGLISH TEACHER WENT ON A 5-MINUTE RANT ABOUT “FUCK” AND HOW IT’S THE ONLY WORD YOU CAN INSERT INTO OTHER WORDS 

I JUST HAVE A LOT OF FEELINGS ABOUT THE WORD “FUCK” OKAY

Actually, ‘fuck’ isn’t the only word you can insert into other words. At least in Australian English, you can do the same with ‘bloody’ — ‘abso-bloody-lutely’. There are probably others too.

for example

thenatezone:

Dear tumblr,

I would like to know the etymology of the word “bamboozle.” I am prepared to accept any explanation at face value. Thank you in advance.

image

from the OED online.

have a map of Austronesian.

(from Tryon, Darrell T. 1995. Comparative Austronesian Dictionary, part 1. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.)

have a map of Austronesian.

(from Tryon, Darrell T. 1995. Comparative Austronesian Dictionary, part 1. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.)

linguisticky:

"More detailed information can be found at the bottom of a rusty filing cabinet in a small highland town in one of the countries you are least likely to ever visit, and even if you did go there you’d probably be collecting the data yourself, given the speakers are actually quite close to this town."

fortunately SIL has put most things online since then (being 1995), so it can all be found for free download here. you know, just in case anyone’s keen for some Dami data.

linguisticky:

"More detailed information can be found at the bottom of a rusty filing cabinet in a small highland town in one of the countries you are least likely to ever visit, and even if you did go there you’d probably be collecting the data yourself, given the speakers are actually quite close to this town."

fortunately SIL has put most things online since then (being 1995), so it can all be found for free download here. you know, just in case anyone’s keen for some Dami data.

"More detailed information can be found at the bottom of a rusty filing cabinet in a small highland town in one of the countries you are least likely to ever visit, and even if you did go there you’d probably be collecting the data yourself, given the speakers are actually quite close to this town."

"More detailed information can be found at the bottom of a rusty filing cabinet in a small highland town in one of the countries you are least likely to ever visit, and even if you did go there you’d probably be collecting the data yourself, given the speakers are actually quite close to this town."

multitalented

Pride, Kitty. 1965. Chatino syntax. Norman: Summer Institute of Linguistics.

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